Tag Archives: Tyus Jones

Tyus Jones: The 1 & Done Who Wasn’t?

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A few years ago, I heard about a conversation that Rick Pitino had about local prep star, Tyus Jones. I was one layer of hearsay removed from it, and it’s been a few years, but here is the general gist of what Pitino apparently said about the Apple Valley prospect:

“Tyus Jones is not a ‘one-and-done.’ He thinks he’s a one-and-done, but he is not a one-and-done.”

It wasn’t an earth-shattering assessment of Tyus, if you had seen what he looked like — scrawny and maybe not even six-feet tall — but I found the phrasing sort of interesting, especially from somebody in Pitino’s position. Pitino probably recruited Jones to play for him at Louisville, and in that process he came away thinking that the kid was more confident about his pro prospects than he should have been. (Also, Pitino’s son Richard had recently taken over the University of Minnesota coaching job, and he was definitely trying to recruit Jones. I’m sure father and son compared notes.) Despite his high hopes for himself, thought Pitino, Jones was not going to be ready for the NBA within nine months of stepping foot on whatever campus he chose. (Duke, as it turned out.)

A few years later, was Pitino right or wrong?

I mean, Tyus was, literally, a one-and-done. He went to Duke, won a national championship (and Most Outstanding Player of the Final Four honors) and was selected by Flip Saunders and the Timberwolves in the first round of the 2015 NBA Draft.

In that respect, Pitino was wrong.

But last year as an NBA rookie, in terms of Tyus’s actual production and overall readiness as an NBA player, Pitino’s assessment was probably validated too. Tyus was overwhelmed in many of his rookie-year stints on the floor. Sam Mitchell remained loyal to the unexpectedly-fallen Flip Saunders and committed to development over “win now” strategies. He played youngsters like Jones the minutes they needed to learn on the job. But in Tyus’s case more than anyone else’s, there was question of whether those minutes were constructive or discouraging.

Jones shot a miserable 35.9 percent from the field. Worse than his shooting percentage was the drop-off in Timberwolves quality of play when Jones manned the point instead of Ricky Rubio. With Rubio at the helm they actually outscored opponents by 1.1 points per 100 possessions, With Tyus, they were outscored by a whopping 10.0 per 100. That is like dropping from a 7 or 8 seed level of play down to the worst team in the entire league.

But watching Jones, three things stood out that gave some hope that his future might still be bright, even if it would require patience.

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Wolves Beat Jazz & Other Jottings

The Wolves got a much-needed win over the Utah Jazz on Wednesday night, holding a lead for nearly every second of the game and ultimately winning 94-80. It was much-needed because the Wolves were on a 4-game losing streak and play at Detroit tomorrow night, and because the Jazz were severely undermanned, missing their two big men, Rudy Gobert and Derrick Favors, as well as the up-and-coming wing Alec Burks. It would have been ugly, had the Wolves lost, so a 14-point win felt good for the team, its fans, and its coach. After the game, Mitchell was in a much better mood than he was during it. He could be seen yelling at his young players throughout the entire game after each mistake they made, sometimes using timeouts to emphasize a point, and other times — such as twice with Karl-Anthony Towns — simply yanking the player after the game. (In his presser, Mitchell laughed about pulling Towns, and went out of his way to talk about what a great attitude KAT has. During the game, KAT seemed upset to come out of the game.)

A few miscellaneous jottings about the game, the Wolves recent play, and team issues:

Rubio
Ricky Rubio has been playing arguably the best ball of his career, of late. His PER before tonight’s game was 18.3, while his career-best before this season was 16.2. After 17 assists against the Jazz, that PER will rise up closer to 19. He’s averaging 9.2 assists to just 2.4 turnovers per game, his 2.3 steals per game are second in the NBA to Russell Westbrook. (Per-36 minutes, Rubio edges out Westbrook in steals, 2.7 to 2.6. Per minute, Rubio is second to Rajon Rondo in assists.) His oft mentioned on/off splits remain an ocean apart, as the Wolves outscore opponents by 3.8 per 100 possessions with Rubio and lose by 8.0 points per 100 without him. While his shooting remains very poor (though he did hit some shots tonight against the Jazz!) the rest of his game is simply so good that it all adds up to a good basketball player. The specific chemistry that he developed — seemingly instantly — with Kevin Garnett has been a joy to watch, and it’s hard not to think that, over time, Rubio and Towns could team up for similar action, connecting on those pick-and-pop assists, and leading the defense top to bottom to get stop after stop in first and fourth quarters. Continue reading

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A Turn Toward Tyus?

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Andy G: Through 30 games, the Timberwolves have already gone through a series of different chapters in their 2015-16 season. Early on, they earned impressive road victories against some of the best teams in the Eastern Conference, and raised expectations that most had just a few weeks earlier. Then Ricky Rubio started sitting out winnable games with a confusingly-described ankle condition, they played LaVine at point guard, Wolves lost those games, and nobody was quite sure what to think of this team. After Rubio returned, and with Karl-Anthony Towns already playing like a veteran star, the Wolves faced a soft schedule phase that included seven consecutive games versus weak opposition (Lakers, Nuggets, Suns, Nuggets, Knicks, Kings, then Nets). Had they been able to string together 5 or 6 wins in that relatively easy stretch, they’d inch back towards .500 and re-enter the Western Conference Playoffs discussion. That did not happen, after they lost four straight in the middle of that stretch and only came out of it with three wins.

Most recently, the Wolves find themselves in a more difficult stretch of games that began at Boston, then came to Target Center for a Spurs matchup, and then again at home against the Pacers. The Celtics and Spurs games were one-sided losses. The Pacers game was close for three and a half quarters, and then became a 14-point loss. On Monday the Wolves play the Spurs again, this time at San Antonio. After that they play the Jazz, who as of this writing would be in the West playoffs. After that they play the Pistons, who are three games over .500. The Wolves record is now down to 11-19, and could easily drop down to 11-22 before the ball drops on New Year’s Eve after the game in Detroit.

Winning one out of three is much better than last season (when they won almost exactly one out of five games), but falls smack in the middle of lottery territory, too. In and of itself, a .333 winning percentage is bad.

There are problems on this team that have now crystallized as they approach the midpoint of the season.

First is the most obvious, the least disturbing, but also the most controllable: The Timberwolves are incredibly young. Their top three leaders in total minutes are each 20 years old. More than anything else (and despite how talented each one of those players is) this is a factor that would prevent any team from seriously contending for a playoff run. Twenty years old is the typical age of college sophomores and juniors, not good NBA basketball players. Andrew Wiggins is great for his age and experience level, but he has flaws. Zach LaVine is getting better, but he was drafted as an athletic “project” and has a long way to go. Karl-Anthony Towns is as good a one-and-done rookie as I can remember watching, but… well, he’s still a rookie and will make certain mistakes now that he won’t make when he’s a few years older. The minutes being played by 20 year olds is something that absolutely should happen, but absolutely will prevent the Wolves from winning a lot of games.

Second is the power forward position. Kevin Garnett is a good defensive player, but he’s tenth on the team in minutes, and that’s without having suffered any injuries. Nemanja Bjelica is currently ninth in total minutes, after beginning the season with solid play in a significant role. Ideally, the Wolves would play Garnett as the ostensible starting four, but Bjelica would play as a stretch and playmaking forward for 25 to 30 minutes per game. Unfortunately, Bjelly is getting worse instead of better with more NBA experience, and now Mitchell has benched him entirely from the playing rotation. (Well, that’s what happened on Saturday versus the Pacers, anyway. He was barely playing in the games leading up to that DNP-CD, and it seems that whether he plays 0 minutes or 5, he’s low on the totem pole.) This means Adreian Payne is playing more, and that’s not going to be good for the Wolves performance. He just makes too many mistakes and has too poor an understanding of basic positioning and fundamentals. As things stand, the Wolves might be best off playing their two young centers together — Towns and Gorgui Dieng — and simply utilizing a “best players on the floor” approach, without regard for positioning and spacing. (Natural segue…)

Third is the team’s offensive system, which encourages a lane jammed up with offensive and defensive players alike, so that they rarely find easy baskets, and rarely cause defenses to move enough to create open three-point shots. It seems like the objective on many Timberwolves sets is either to find an open mid-range shooter, or to feed the low post. This is in contrast to good modern NBA offenses, which generally try to create open driving lanes for layups, or drive-and-kick action where help defenders have to scramble all over the place to try to run shooters off the three-point line while not giving up a layup to a different player after the ball is moving. The Wolves shoot 16.3 threes per game, which is second only to the Brooklyn Nets for fewest in the league. The shoot 25.6 shots in the restricted area — very close to the hoop — which is tenth-fewest in the league. As you might expect, knowing that the Wolves shoot so few threes and layups, they lead the league in mid-range shots, attempting 28.4 of them per game. Mid-range shots are not necessarily bad, but they only make sense if they are wide open, and if there is a great shooter taking them. For instance, the Clippers and Spurs both shoot a lot from the mid-range but that’s because opponents forfeit wide open Blake Griffin shots from there as a way to avoid him from dunking after Chris Paul starts bending the defenses off of a ball screen. For San Antonio, they just picked up LaMarcus Aldridge, a great mid-range shooter with enough size to couple his shooting threat with playmaking for teammates. The Spurs and Clippers shoot 42 and 40 percent from mid-range, respectively, while the Wolves hit just 38 percent of them.

Fourth and lastly, is the team’s backup point guard situation. As mentioned previously, Rubio missed some games earlier in the season with ankle soreness. It was 6 games total and the Wolves lost 5 of those. Their 10-14 record with Rubio in the lineup would give them a winning percentage right between the Jazz and Kings; the current 8 and 9 seeds in the West. When Ricky’s on the floor, the Wolves outscore opponents by 3.3 points per 100 possessions, and when he sits they are outscored by 7.8 points per 100. That 11.1-point swing is enormous, and it comes largely by the choice of the organization; the choice of not playing Andre Miller as the regular backup point guard. On the entire roster, only Miller has a better net rating (+5.2) than Rubio. For much of the season, the backup point guard was LaVine, who most by now believe is better suited to play off guard. Very recently, Mitchell has indeed moved LaVine to off guard, but not next to Miller. Instead, the team called back Tyus Jones, the rookie doing D-League service for six games, and has slotted him into the rotation as the backup point guard.

The turn toward Tyus is a fairly unmistakable sign that the team is done trying to flirt with a competitive season. Jones might have a future (I tend to believe he does, others worry about his lack of size and explosiveness) but nobody reasonably believes he is presently able to play NBA point guard at a competitive level. These minutes that he receives — 20 versus the Spurs in (-11) action, and 11 more consequential ones versus the Pacers in (-13) action — will be the same type of on-the-job training that LaVine experienced last year. They might pique the interest of Minnesota sports fans, and will probably help accustom Jones to NBA game speed. But they will also frustrate the diehard Wolves fans watching most or all games, and possibly frustrate some of Tyus’s teammates — through no fault of his own — if he is incapable of hanging in there against top competition.

I just wrote a lot of words about a lot of Wolves stuff.

Patrick J, what are your thoughts on any or all of it? Do you like the move toward Jones as the backup point guard?

Patrick J: Do I like the move toward Jones as the backup point guard? Yes, but with caveats. Continue reading

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Shifting Expectations, Wolves Lose Big to Thunder

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Tyus Jones, barely removed from Apple Valley High, started at point guard tonight versus Russ Westbrook.

How a person feels about tonight’s preseason game against the Oklahoma City Thunder depends largely on what that person expected, going into the game, and why they held those expectations. Ricky Rubio has been held out of action for the past few days and we knew that he would not play tonight. (His ailments are not expected to be serious or threaten his regular-season availability.) Add to that the announcement that 19-year old, was-attending-Apple Valley-High-School-17-months-ago Tyus Jones would replace Rubio in the starting lineup against Russell Westbrook, and nobody could reasonably expect a successful outcome. Along with the Jones/Rubio lineup swap, Sam Mitchell made a surprising proclamation yesterday: Zach LaVine will be this team’s starting shooting guard; not Kevin Martin, who was named the starter by… well, himself, at Media Day. This announcement was Mitchell putting bold, italized, capitalized type on that DEVELOPMENT word that he has been throwing around ever since taking over coaching duties. LaVine as a Day 1 starter sends a clear message that potential, and future take priority over actualized ability and the present.

So with all of that built into people’s respective Game Previews, a 23-point loss to the full-strength (well, aside from Steven Adams) Thunder was not surprising. The Wolves starting lineup featured two one-and-done rookies, and two one-and-done sophomores. None of these four are old enough to legally enter a bar in Downtown Minneapolis and yet there they were, all four of em trying to guard Westbrook, Durant, and Ibaka.

Defense was the big, obvious problem tonight. Aside from when Kevin Garnett was on the floor (all of 7 minutes 52 seconds) and when Westbrook and Durant were on the bench (they were both game-high +22’s) the Wolves simply could not get stops. Westbrook was coming off of high ball screens and flooring the accelerator straight down the middle of the lane. Help usually came, but the defense was so out of sorts that Russ was able to do something good with the ball almost every time. He had 14 points and 13 assists on the night, and was every bit as insane out there as he would be in a Finals game.

When the Thunder were not rolling behind Westbrook penetration (or transition sequences) they were running Durant off of Enes Kanter down screens, setting up equally unstoppable action on the wing. Durant, against this defense anyway, makes this a pick-your-poison proposition if there ever was one. Too much help led to nifty passes slipped to Kanter for an easy two points. Not enough help meant, well, Durant would score it himself.

In my opinion, the Westbrook stuff was more preventable (by a hypothetical, good defensive team) than what Durant was doing on the wing. I think Ricky Rubio would do a much better job than Jones and Lorenzo Brown did of jumping out, forcing Russ different directions from where he wanted to go, and at least making him do something besides those halfback dives to the rim.

In any case, the defense struggled. They gave up 122 points on 56 percent field goal shooting. It’s hard to say anything but bad stuff about that. It looked like last year, with the caveat that they (for 22 of the 48 minutes, when Russ & KD played) were facing elite competition.

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Vegas, Baby, Vegas: The 2015 Timberwolves Summer League Edition

Towns and LaVine, postgame antics

Towns and LaVine, postgame antics

The last time we posted, it was June 29, and Andy G mused about the Wolves’ 2015 draft, in which they selected the much-haralded Karl-Anthony Towns #1 overall and pulled off a trade to get back into the first round to draft Apple Valley native and Duke Final Four hero Tyus Jones at number 24.

Much of the reaction to the draft fell into a few different bins. One bin could be called “Yay, we took Karl-Anthony Towns #1!” This encompassed most of Wolves fandom, at least that segment of which is most active on Twitter and websites like Canis Hoopus. Towns was the consensus top player overall and Wolves brass finally made the obvious correct choice: they got the player that analysts and smart fans expect to be the best player from this draft. Towns fills a position of need for the Timberwolves. Nikola Pekovic, the brutish but oft-injured Montenegrin who is under contract with the Wolves through the 2017–18 season, has foot injuries that may end up threatening his career. He can’t be counted on as an integral anchor for the Wolves at center as the rest of the team blossoms under the leadership of rising stars like Andrew Wiggins and Ricky Rubio, not to mention intriguing prospects like Shabazz Muhammad and Zach LaVine. Kevin Garnett is also back in the fold, on a two-year, $16 million deal. But Garnett cannot be fully counted-on either, for he is too old and too often injured. His return appears more as foreshadowing his move into ownership and management with Flip Saunders and Glen Taylor than it does a productive output on the floor this season or next. The bottom-line is, the Wolves had a need at Center. As a marvelously skilled big man, Towns should eliminate that need altogether.

A second bin of Wolves draft-related conversation could be called “We took Tyus Jones! He’s from Minnesota!” I’ll talk a bit about Jones first, and then discuss my reactions to Karl Towns.

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Towns, Tyus, and Building a Nucleus

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As you already know, the draft was last Thursday, and it was a big one for our favorite team. I decided to take it in over at the new Mayo Clinic facilities, and swing through the arena for the announcement of the first pick. What follows is some parts recap of that night, with some thoughts about the Wolves two draft picks and where the team finds itself right now, heading into Summer 2015.

Karl-Anthony Towns

The Wolves first draft selection was equal parts boring and exciting. For at least a few days, the media had been reporting that Flip was going to draft Karl-Anthony Towns from Kentucky. Brian Windhorst went on ESPN — live, from Minneapolis — shortly before the pick was officially announced by Adam Silver, to confirm that this was still the case. So there was not the unpredictability that has come to define Timberwolves drafts of the past decade. As expected, the Wolves chose Towns.

Perhaps that was a good thing this time around, because in taking Towns the Wolves set the Target Center crowd on fire with cheers. Its team had just taken the consensus “best player in the draft,” for the first time in franchise history. In his conference call with Minnesota media on Thursday night, and especially at his introductory press conference the next day in Minneapolis, Towns said all the right things. He compared joining the emerging nucleus of young Timberwolves talent to playing for Kentucky. He looks forward to being mentored by Kevin Garnett, because he wants to learn what it takes to become a champion. He looks forward to taking care of his parents, who sacrificed so much for him to reach this point. He is emphasizing “playoffs” as a goal for this team. Like, right away. Whether unrealistic or not, that’s a refreshing thing to hear said, after a season spent losing on purpose.

The psychoanalysis that we all perform on these 20-year olds is unfair for a number of reasons; perhaps most of all because of the unusual venue in which we observe them. But we do it nonetheless. Andrew Wiggins is a man of few words. He’d rather let his actions on the court speak for themselves. Zach LaVine has a well-intentioned cockiness about him. When most of the new, young Wolves looked nervous on Media Day last year — usually sharing the press conference table with a teammate — the 19-year old, looked-more-like-15-year-old, LaVine sat by himself and began his own presser with a, “Sup wit y’all?” to the media before him.

Towns is thoughtful and gregarious. He enjoys speaking to an audience, but carefully considers a question before answering it. In the past year, he has listed Len Bias as his favorite player, and shouted out Felipe Lopez as a fellow Dominican baller. For a 19-year old, he’s showing off impressive knowledge of basketball esoterica. Whether any of this matters once he steps on the court is a fair question, but for now the personality is all we’ve had a chance to see, and Karl-Anthony Towns “won” his press conference. Assuming he can play like most expect, Towns is going to be a fan favorite.

Tyus Jones

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INBOX: NBA Draft Week is Upon Us

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The 1st Round: Towns as the now-inevitable #1 pick.

Andy G: First off, Happy Draft Week. Whatever this says about us, and the team that we cheer for, this is usually the highlight of our NBA season and a time clearly marked off on our calendars. This is an especially big one, what with the Wolves picking first overall for the first time ever. (Eds note: But this year’s will join the last two top picks on the Wolves roster, who came over in the K-Love trade. Thanks, LeBron!) Also, the Wolves are picking high in the 2nd Round. There’s some question as to whether they’ll keep both picks, or use them on players that will immediately join the NBA, but the fact is they have them and that means more to discuss.

I’ve written some things about the Wolves top pick; specifically, whether they should use it on Karl Anthony-Towns from Kentucky, or Jahlil Okafor from Duke. For a while, it seemed like Flip was going to take Okafor, a player he was (reportedly) enamored with all season — possibly to the extent that the possibility of drafting Okafor helped motivate the season’s big tanking decisions, like holding Ricky Rubio out of games for much longer than he had to.

But late in the college season, the general scouting consensus (Draft Express and the NBA scouts who talk to Chad Ford) shifted from Okafor to Towns as the draft’s best prospect. The best stats projection models also prefer Towns to Okafor. Now it is widely believed that Flip’s mind has changed as well. There was a period of time when it was rumored that the Wolves personnel staff preferred Towns, but Flip still preferred Okafor. This was disconcerting to read, not because of the conclusion itself (I’m on record as loving Okafor’s potential, and even slightly preferring him to Towns based on what I watched) but because of what it suggested about the team’s structure and process.

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